leaves

Rethinking Leaves

mow leaves and leave them on the lawn

Have you turned a new leaf when it comes to land care? Many people have. For instance, we plant for pollinators, choose native plants, reduce lawn sizes, and use electric equipment instead of gas-powered. Most of those changes take place within the confines of our properties without attracting negative attention.

The same is not always true for autumn leaves.

The stray leaf, blowing in the wind on a dry fall day, has pushed more than a few neighbors into standoffs behind their rakes and leaf-blowers. That's true even now, when it’s no secret that we live in a time where lawns, gardens, parks, and street-scapes are meaningful to the survival of regional species.

Fall Land Care Tips, 2017-style, and Trends to Watch

Leaves are not litter by Xerces Society

An elderly farmer once told me, "In 90 years of living, I've learned one thing. Change is the only constant." The fall of 2017 would make him smile. Everywhere I look, people are exploring new ideas in land care--and some of them are as old as the hills. If even some of these trends take hold, our individual and commercial landscapes will be notably different in the near future. Please use the link above to learn more. 

Five Ways to Make the Most of Leaves

Fall leaves

Some people say there are two ways of looking at everything. This certainly applies to our autumn leaf bonanza. We can view it as a big, boring yard job--or as a tremendous free source of soil fertility for the coming year. 

There are five ways, by my count, to capture the value of leaves. See my latest article, "Put Leaf Mulch to Work," in New London's Day newspaper for some ideas. If you're having trouble with the link, please download the file below. 

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